Home > Events > Seminars, Training Programs and Conferences @ AIT
Events

Seminars, Training Programs and Conferences @ AIT

22 Feb 2002
Pakkamol Dherapongsthada

Seminars, Training Programs and
Conferences @ AIT

SERD SEMINAR: PRECAUTIONARY PRINCIPLE – WHAT LEVEL OF PROOF IN ENVIRONMENTAL DECISION MAKING?

Prof. Poul Harremoes of the Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, will conduct this seminar on Thursday, 21 February at 2 p.m. at the Milton E. Bender Jr. Auditorium. Prof. Harremoes is a well-known authority in environmental management and a recipient of the prestigious ‘Stockholm Water Prize’, and more recently, the ‘Heineken Prize’.

ABSTRACT :

According to established principles, an activity or an agent is assumed harmless until proven harmful. That is how international trade is regulated through WTO. The interpretation is that ‘scientific proof’ is needed to regulate an activity or agent. The question is whether such a stringent requirement is warranted in a situation where the public is exposed to the potential harm. The basic question is: Who carries the burden of the risk of being wrong? Presently, there is a conflict between USA and EU about import of beef with residual growth hormones to EU. The European Environment Agency published on 11 January 2002 a report on The Precautionary Principle. Prof. Harremoes, chairman of the editorial committee, will present the results.

The report is available on the EEA-webpage:
http://reports.eea.eu.int/environmental_issue_report_2001_22/en.

For reservations, please contact Khun Suchitra Piempimsest, Urban Environmental Engineering and Management Program, SERD, AIT, P.O. Box 4 Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120. Fax: (66)-2524-5625. E-mail: suchitra@ait.ac.th

WIRELESS FUTURE AND CHALLENGING WIRELESS TECHNIQUES

The Telecommunications Program of School of Advanced Technologies and the IEEE Communications Society (COMSOC), Thailand Chapter will organize a lecture on Wednesday, 27 February at 1:30 p.m. in the Milton E. Bender Jr. Auditorium.

,b>The lecture — sponsored by the Communications Research Lab (CRL) Japan — will be conducted by Prof. Fumiyuki Adachi.

GENETIC ALGORITHMS FOR JOB SCHEDULING IN AGV-SERVED MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS SEMINAR

A special seminar entitled ‘Genetic Algorithms for Job Scheduling in
AGV-served Manufacturing Systems’ will be held on 7 March at 10:00 a.m.,
room IE115, Chalerm Prakiat Building
.

The seminar will be conducted by Dr. Tharma Ganesharajah, a candidate for a faculty position in
IE&M; field

Interested persons are invited.

ABSTRACT:

In an AGV-served flowshop loop that produces a set of different
jobs repetitively, the job scheduling method to maximizing throughput is
studied. The computational complexity results are formally proved for all
but one scheduling problems. Heuristics are suggested and tested for the
intractable problems. Since the performance of heuristics is not
satisfactory, Darwin’s natural evolution based genetic algorithms (GA) are
developed to obtain good solutions. The GA solution is compared with a
lower bound on throughput developed using Lagrangian relaxation approach.

COMPUTATIONAL GRIDS: NEW CHALLENGES FOR DISTRIBUTED COMPUTING

The Computer Science and Information Management (CSIM) Program, School of Advanced Technologies will be holding a special lecture on 8 March 2002, 1:00 p.m. in CS Room 209. The lecture entitled ‘Computational Grids: New Challenges for Distributed Computing‘ will be conducted by Prof. Yakup Paker (e-mail: Paker@dcs.qmul.ac.uk), Department of Computer Science, Queen Mary, University of London.

ABSTRACT:

Clustering of a wide variety of geographically distributed resources, such as supercomputers, storage systems, data sources, special facilities, etc., as a unified resource has led to the concept of ‘Computational Grids’. This is analogous to the electrical power grid that provides power to consumers by simple electrical connections, irrespective where the power generators are located or their type. The computational grid technology thus attempts to provide users transparent access to the entire set of resources connected. Thus the computational grid needs to cope with aspects such as authentication, name space, resource management, scheduling, accounting, etc. At the same time, a number of problems in modern distributed computing are being addressed under the area broadly referred as peer-to-peer computing. Under this heading a wide range of technologies are developed to increase the utilisation of information, bandwidth and computing resources in the Internet. This lecture investigates the type of problems posed by the computational grids and to what extend those overlap with or differ from the concerns of peer-to-peer distributed computing.

FUTURE WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS; SOFTWARE RECONFIGURABLE RADIO

The Telecommunications Program of School of Advanced Technologies, AIT and the IEEE Communications Society (COMSOC), Thailand Chapter will organize a lecture on Friday, 8 March at 3:00 p.m. in the Milton E. Bender Jr. Auditorium.

The lecture — sponsored by the Communications Research Lab (CRL) Japan — will be conducted by Prof. Ryuji Kohno.